Why it’s not just assessors who benefit from multiple choice(s)

Think of university assessment and it probably conjures anxiety. As David Boud notes: even successful, able and committed students – those who become university teachers – have been hurt by their experiences of assessment, time and time again, through school and through higher education. Even the very language of assessment, essays and exams is etymologically […]

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Ethics in social media research: do we know what we are doing?

By Michael Henderson, Nicola F. Johnson, Glenn Auld and Phillip Dawson – originally published on the Monash Learning with New Media research group blog   Social media, such as social network sites and blogs, are increasingly being used as core or ancillary components of educational research, from recruitment to observation and interaction with participants. However, the new mediated […]

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Are lectures a good way to learn?

By Phillip Dawson, Monash University Imagine a future where university enrolment paperwork is accompanied by the statement: Warning: lectures may stunt your academic performance and increase risk of failure. Researchers from the United States have just published an exhaustive review and their findings support that warning. They read every available research study comparing traditional lectures […]

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